Autism in adulthood: What it does to your romantic relationships

Photo by Arthur Brognoli on Pexels.com

Many high-functioning autistic adults are in romantic relationships, and as a result they experience the same relationship challenges that neurotypical people do. One major difference is that high-functioning autistics may not be able to express their emotions well or know what other people’s emotions are, which can lead to misunderstandings. This article will discuss how high functioning autism affects an adult’s romantic relationships.

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– high-functioning autism can make it difficult for an autistic adult to express their emotions well or know what other people’s emotions are, which leads to misunderstandings.

– high functioning autistics may not be able to read social cues as easily and they won’t be good at picking up on nonverbal communication like body language. This means that high functioning autistics often have trouble understanding when someone is trying to tell them something important, such as a warning about the safety of an activity.

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– some high functioning autistic adults will need time alone, while others crave more intimate contact with friends and partners than neurotypical persons do. High functioning autistics who require less intimacy in relationships might find themselves feeling isolated from everyone else and may withdraw.

– high functioning autistics have a high level of sensitivity to sensory stimuli and as a result they might be more affected by loud sounds, bright lights or strong smells than other people are.

– high functioning autistic adults experience relationship challenges much the same way that neurotypical people do; however, one significant difference is that high functioning autistics often lack social awareness and interpersonal skills because of their autism spectrum disorder. This means that high functioning autistics will need extra time outside of relationships for personal development so they can become better at reading subtle cues in others’ behavior and communicating effectively with them later on.

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Marriage

I have been married twice. I got divorced twice. I have 2 beautiful daughters, one with each ex. All of this happened before I received my diagnosis.

I am certain that if I had been aware of my condition earlier, that it would have gone differently, but, having gone through the darkness has taught me invaluable lessons.

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I am in a relationship now with a wonderful woman and she knows about my condition, accepts it and support me.

I think I got this now…but I do have to point out that it was hard on all my previous partners. But then again, I was not the same person back then, I am now myself.

Be yourself, only to such an extent that the world does not reject you entirely.

Remember, there are a lot of kind people in the world, if you cannot find one, be one.

By anonymousgods

High-Functioning Autistic Savant with co-morbid ADHD and OCPD

2 comments

  1. I’ve been married – and divorced – twice, and without your diagnosis as a place to consider putting some of the fault. It was just my own misunderstanding of what love was and my desire to please other people or to escape where I was at in life. We all can look back and see how we’d have done things differently – it’s called hindsight. But we do need that hindsight from which to grow and learn. I’m happy that you’ve found someone willing to invest in YOU as who you are!

    Liked by 2 people

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