Is Fitness A Prerequisite For Success?

Fitness has been a prominent topic of interest for thousands of years. It is defined as the quality or state of being fit, but its meaning can be used in other contexts such as figuratively (he’s unfit to lead).

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Fitness comes from the Latin adjective “firmitas,” which can mean strength and durability. Furthermore, it has Greek roots, stemming from “physis,” which is defined as nature, growth or origin.

It can be argued that fitness is important for success in life. The research has found many correlations between the two concepts. This article will discuss these findings and provide suggestions on how to maintain healthy levels of fitness.

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            A 2010 study conducted at the University of Queensland found that people who regularly worked out had healthier brains than those who seldom exercised. An MRI scan showed that even if one has a family history of mental illness, exercising regularly can reduce the chances of developing Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia later in life.

            Fitness is important for success at work, too. For example, research conducted at the University of Bristol suggests that exercise can improve performance of employees in different ways. The study found that regular workouts reduced fatigue, allowing employees to have more energy for their on-the-job responsibilities.

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            Another benefit is increased cognitive capacity, which enhanced the ability of workers to solve problems better than before. The University of Bristol study also found that even moderate amounts of exercise, such as running on a treadmill for 15 minutes, could improve overall brain function in specific ways.

            Furthermore, fitness can increase an employee’s creativity levels when completing work-related tasks. A 2014 study conducted at the University of Illinois discovered that this benefit is especially important in the workplace.

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            The researchers found that when one is more physically fit, it can lead to an increase in divergent thinking, also known as creative problem solving. This type of thinking is different than convergent thinking, which, according to Peter Smith at Psychology Today, “is used for solving problems that have correct answers.”

            The University of Illinois study was based on two experiments. In the first, one group rode exercise bikes for 10 minutes while another group sat on stationary bikes without moving their legs; both groups were then asked to complete a creative imagery task. The second experiment involved a “more standardized protocol,” which also included a shuttle-run activity in between the bike-riding activities.

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            The results were positive in both instances. The researchers said, “we found that higher fitness levels correlated with greater creativity on the tasks, particularly for the group who had cycled.”

            There are numerous other benefits of staying healthy and fit. An article by Pearsonsuggests that a person can “live a happier, healthier and more productive life” with exercise. Furthermore, the article states that staying physically fit also decreases stress, anxiety and depression levels.

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            In essence, it is no secret that achieving a healthy level of fitness is important for success in life. The research provides ample evidence that working out consistently has numerous benefits. Whether one wants to excel in their career, be happier or have a healthier brain, being physically fit is the key to long-term success.

            As Charles Duhigg writes in The Power of Habit , “People who exercise develop willpower and self-control.” This means that by maintaining physical fitness, one will have enough energy and capability to be successful at work and in other aspects of life.

Conclusion

I find that being active helps calm my autism.

2 thoughts on “Is Fitness A Prerequisite For Success?

  1. This reminds me that the one-time world chess champion, Russian Boris Spassky, was also a weight-lifter and claimed that it was a key part of his remaining fit for championship chess.

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